THIS PROJECT’S OBJECT IS TO RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT MISOGYNY, EMPHASIZING BOREDOM IN IMAGES AND STORIES OF WOMEN WHO WERE IN THE PUBLIC EYE OVER.

︎

THIS ONLINE PLATFORM IS NOW OPENED TO RECEIVE BORED-TO-DEATH WOMEN STORIES FROM PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.


IF YOU WANT TO SEND DATA YOU’RE WELCOME TO CATCH THE FLYING ENVELOPES.

︎
While wandering around the most popular art museums in London, one can feel overwhelmed by the huge collection of art they have hanging on their walls and dressing up their rooms. However, it is easy to pick up on the obvious regarding the paintings: the vast majority of paintings were made by men, meaning that men painted men as well as painted women. But women did not paint. (are you sure?)

In fact, women have mostly had the role of muses in art history. They have been portrayed while cleaning, cooking, babysitting, or posing as unanimated objects. They have always been thought of as the object to be painted, obviously by men. But they did not seem to like it. Focusing our attention on women’s faces and bodies, it is clearly seen that there is no emotion, they just look bored. It is easy to think that men did not care about women’s emotions, thoughts, or successes. That’s why women in paintings look bored. Bored to death.

The Obituary of Boredom was firstly meant to be just an hyperbole and emphasized image-compilation of jaded women. Working as a chapel-shaped static obituary, this visual shows the irritation and frustration of women over men's oppression.

However, I wanted this discussion to evolve. By taking this animated image as the starting point of the project, The Obituary of Boredom has now become an online cemetery. It gathers a diversety of women who were in the public eye and the satiric stories of how they died of boredom. They were so tired of society’s misogyny that they bored to death.

The paintings used in the animated image are photographies personally taken in the National Gallery of London, the Tate’s Modern and the Britain’s Museum in London.

Clara Gràcia Closa 2021 ︎